Blog

SCARF 2017: A modern-day transatlantic crossing

At 16:00 UTC (12 noon, EST) on October 8 2017, midway across the Atlantic Ocean, Earth’s magnetic field strength dropped to 0. Had we just made an exciting new discovery? Was this evidence of an imminent geomagnetic reversal? Was a mysterious lump of magnetite on the seafloor cancelling out the ambient field?…or did the magnetometer…

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Coastal oceanography in the height of hurricane season

Written By: Mallory Ringham Oceanographic research cruises are typically planned months, if not years, in advance of sailing. So we often have to view cruise itineraries as suggestions rather than as definite plans, with an understanding that weather and equipment status may significantly impact scientific goals. On September 8, the CO2 Systems Laboratory from Woods…

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What WiXII wants: How Women at MIT are Working for Equality

Written By: Suzi Clark Women at MIT have decided it’s time for a change. The Department of Earth, Atmosphere, and Planetary Sciences (EAPS) has been a staple of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology since 1983. Its scientists have published thousands of papers in topics ranging from the solid earth 3,000 miles below our feet to…

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We’ll be back next week!

Sometimes writing is exhausting. We’re taking a short break this week. We’ll be back next Monday, September 18. We want to take a moment to remember all of those affected during the September 11, 2001 tragedies. Our hearts also go out to Florida and the Caribbean islands impacted by Hurricane Irma this past weekend.  

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Why is wave climate important?

When scientists and non-scientists alike hear the word “climate,” often what springs to mind are concepts relating to the atmosphere: air temperature, greenhouse gases, wind, rain, storms, etc. In fact, the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change states that, “Climate in a narrow sense is usually defined as the ‘average weather’ … [which is defined more…

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Unraveling Earth’s Natural Time Capsules – The GeoChronR Workshop

By Lizzie Wallace The Arizona Shuttle rolls up to Flagstaff, Arizona, quite a different scene from the miles and miles of barren desert I’ve been riding through on my travel from the Phoenix Skyharbor International Airport to Northern Arizona University (NAU). At 7000 ft, Flagstaff is a cool 70 degrees surrounded by trees, mountains and…

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A glider’s journey in the Gulf Stream

Written by Joleen Heiderich We are cruising towards the open ocean in a small towboat while the Miami skyline is shrinking in the distance behind us. For Captain Pete, this short trip will be a change from his daily routine. Instead of towing boats, he will help two scientists with the deployment of an instrument…

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