Blog

Following snails around the world

Written By: Lauren Dykman Many scientists can link their research interests or career trajectory back to a childhood fascination. The ability to recognize beauty and intrigue in the mundane and every-day is a talent strongest in childhood, and many scientists seem to maintain this ability throughout life. Such a childhood fascination struck me when I…

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Once upon a time, scientists were told they should tell stories…

  If you’ve ever been to/heard/read/seen/smelled even the most basic talks on science communication strategies the one thing you’ve probably been told (over and over) is to tell stories. Perhaps I was born without the apparently universal intuition for what a “story” should be, but I always find it incredibly frustrating that many times the…

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The Superb Owl

  JP’ers were too enthralled searching for the Superb Owl this weekend to write a blog post. We’ll be back next week!  

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Sketchnoting, or how to tame your thoughts

Shortly after ringing in the New Year, I headed to San Francisco for the annual meeting of the Society for Integrative and Comparative Biology (SICB), where scientists gathered to share their most newly acquired knowledge about the behavior, genetics, locomotion, evolution, metabolism, and many other aspects of just about every branch of the tree of…

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Dead Storm Hunting: Fiji and Vanuatu

By: James Bramante, PhD student in the MIT/WHOI Joint Program This blog is cross-posted on the Coastal Systems Group website.   There’s nothing like arctic weather to make you nostalgic for tropical fieldwork. During the past month, temperatures dropped to 5 F (-15 C) in Boston and Cape Cod. With wind chill it felt like…

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Harry Potter and the 12-minute conference talk

One of my favorite podcasts, Harry Potter and the Sacred Text, begins each episode with a segment called the “30 second recap”: Vanessa and Casper, the two hosts, get 30 seconds each to summarize everything that happened in a single chapter of a Harry Potter book*. They start out speaking normally, covering everything in detail,…

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We’ve bitten off more than we can chew

Writing blogs while digesting Thanksgiving dinner can be daunting. As the holidays can also induce similar bouts of lethargy, we’ll be back in the new year. Have a fabulous holiday season, and Happy New Year! If you were wondering about the picture: It’s a shark that got a bit too curious about WHOI science and…

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Discussing climate science from all angles: 2017 Graduate climate conference

Written by Jacob Forsyth While international world leaders met in Bonn to discuss how to address our changing climate, a lesser known climate-orientated meeting occurred simultaneously. In Woods Hole, Massachusetts, 84 graduate students from many disciplines of climate research gathered for the 11th annual Graduate Climate Conference (GCC). Graduate students from the Massachusetts Institution of…

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Swimming in confidence: Recap of SWMS 2017 fall symposium

Written By: Christina Hernandez The Society for Women in Marine Science brings together marine scientists of all career levels to discuss the diverse experiences of women in marine science, celebrate the research done by women in the field, and promote the visibility of women in the marine science community. The Society for Women in Marine…

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Out of the ocean

Science fiction and Hollywood authors have provided increasingly sophisticated jump-so-much-you-drop-your-popcorn monsters, mutants, and aliens over the years, some of which you might have seen haunting the streets this past weekend. Even the fanciest CGI though can’t quite match mother nature’s own bizarre creations. Here’s my shortlist of the creepy-crawliest ocean inhabitants. The most likely to…

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