Blog

We’ve bitten off more than we can chew

  Writing blogs while digesting Thanksgiving dinner can be daunting. We’ll be back soon. If you were wondering about the picture: It’s a shark that got a bit too curious about WHOI science and nibbled on the REMUS. The REMUS is an underwater vehicle that WHOI engineers made. Watch the video here.

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Discussing climate science from all angles: 2017 Graduate Climate Conference

Written by Jacob Forsyth While international world leaders met in Bonn to discuss how to address our changing climate, a lesser known climate-orientated meeting occurred simultaneously. In Woods Hole, Massachusetts, 84 graduate students from many disciplines of climate research gathered for the 11th annual Graduate Climate Conference (GCC). Graduate students from the Massachusetts Institution of…

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Swimming in Confidence: Recap of SWMS Fall Symposium 2017

Written By: Christina Hernandez The Society for Women in Marine Science brings together marine scientists of all career levels to discuss the diverse experiences of women in marine science, celebrate the research done by women in the field, and promote the visibility of women in the marine science community. The Society for Women in Marine…

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Out of the ocean

Science fiction and Hollywood authors have provided increasingly sophisticated jump-so-much-you-drop-your-popcorn monsters, mutants, and aliens over the years, some of which you might have seen haunting the streets this past weekend. Even the fanciest CGI though can’t quite match mother nature’s own bizarre creations. Here’s my shortlist of the creepy-crawliest ocean inhabitants. The most likely to…

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SCARF 2017: A modern-day transatlantic crossing

At 16:00 UTC (12 noon, EST) on October 8 2017, midway across the Atlantic Ocean, Earth’s magnetic field strength dropped to 0. Had we just made an exciting new discovery? Was this evidence of an imminent geomagnetic reversal? Was a mysterious lump of magnetite on the seafloor cancelling out the ambient field?…or did the magnetometer…

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Coastal oceanography in the height of hurricane season

Written By: Mallory Ringham Oceanographic research cruises are typically planned months, if not years, in advance of sailing. So we often have to view cruise itineraries as suggestions rather than as definite plans, with an understanding that weather and equipment status may significantly impact scientific goals. On September 8, the CO2 Systems Laboratory from Woods…

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What WiXII wants: How Women at MIT are Working for Equality

Written By: Suzi Clark Women at MIT have decided it’s time for a change. The Department of Earth, Atmosphere, and Planetary Sciences (EAPS) has been a staple of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology since 1983. Its scientists have published thousands of papers in topics ranging from the solid earth 3,000 miles below our feet to…

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We’ll be back next week!

Sometimes writing is exhausting. We’re taking a short break this week. We’ll be back next Monday, September 18. We want to take a moment to remember all of those affected during the September 11, 2001 tragedies. Our hearts also go out to Florida and the Caribbean islands impacted by Hurricane Irma this past weekend.  

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